Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Vitamin B7 (Biotin) - What does it do? Where do I get it? How much do I need daily? What are the symptoms of deficiency?
Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Why Is Vitamin
B7 (Biotin) Important To Your Body?

Like many other vitamins from the B family, vitamin B7 plays a vital role in assisting enzymes to break down fats, carbohydrates, and proteins in food. It also helps to regulate signals sent by cells and the activity of genes.

Where do I get it?

Bacteria in the large intestine produce biotin that can be absorbed by the large intestine in amounts that depend on the diet. Main sources of vitamin B7 in a normal diet, even if in small quantities, are nuts, seeds, liver, pork, salmon, avocado and cooked eggs.

How much do I need?

The daily requirement of biotin is only 30 μg, which can be easily satisfied from a normal diet because the average Western diet contains 35–70 μg biotin per day.

No evidence in humans has shown some toxicity of biotin even with high intakes. Because it is water-soluble, any excess amount leaves through the urine. There is no established upper limit or toxic level for biotin.

What happens if I don’t get enough Vitamin B7

Vitamin B7 Biotin deficiency can be caused by inadequate dietary intake or inheritance of one or more inborn genetic disorders that affect biotin metabolism. Deficiency can cause mild symptoms, such as hair thinning or skin rash typically on the face.

Read More About Other Essential Vitamins On b-someone.com

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